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Canada's New HOS Rules

They're certainly different. And they certainly don't leave much in terms of flexibility, but they're here and we have to comply with them. If you're still not sure how they work, you're not alone. We get lots of calls from drivers and fleets about these new rules and how to comply with them.

By now, you'll no doubt have had a situation arise where there's a question on how to interpret a part of the rule. Not all of those questions have as yet been answered. And you're bound to hear at least three different versions on an interpretation from one of those truckstop lawyers you run into everywhere.

So what we've done to help you make sense of these new rules is post as much information as we think you'll find useful here in our HOS archive.

You'll find a copy of the actual federal regulation as well as something Transport Canada calls an Application Guide. This document was drawn up in response to questions the creators of the rules had about the final "legal" version. Basically, it's a "question & answer" format, and it's quite informative.

Other documents include presentations created by Ontario and British Columbia to help drivers understand the new rules. They're pretty straight forward and explanatory.

There are a few other pieces here that might help as well, so we think this is a pretty comprehensive archive of HOS training and educational material.

Please feel free to read or download these. It's all about helping you understand these new rules and make the best of the working time you'll have left to get your work done.

Dig in …

Archived HOS Files

Transitional Enforcement Policy
This is the communiqué issued by the Canadian Council of Motor Transport Administrators (CCMTA) just before Christmas outlining how enforcement will be conducted given that only three provinces will have the new rules ensconced in legislation by New Year's Day. It also declares when the rest of the provinces will be implementing the new rules locally.

Canada's New HOS rule
The official text of the new rule, published in Canada Gazette Part II on November 16, 2005. We offer the official PDF version of that issue of Canada Gazette, and a text-only version in MS WORD, copied directly from the original PDF. The WORD version is easier to read and comes in a smaller file size.

HOS Application Guide
This document is an un-official interpretation of the HOS rules used by the provinces to establish enforcement policy. Many questions are asked and answered in plain English. Be aware that this document is a work in progress, and there are in fact several conflicting variations of answers to similar questions. While it will shed some light on the more confusing interpretations of the new rules, it is not to be used as the final arbiter in legal questions arising about HOS. For the exact phrasing of the rule, please see the Canada Gazatte Part II document. 

BC Drivers' Guide
An illustrated guide produced by BC's Ministry of the Attorney General. It contains text and illustrations as well as quizzes and background information on the new rules. (The information contained will apply not just to BC, but to all Canadian drivers in all jurisdictions. The information is BC's interpretation of the rules, which won't vary substantially from other jurisdictions - except possibly Alberta's intraprovincial carriers.)

Ont. Drivers' Guide
A short and to the point tutorial on how to comply with Canada's new HOS rule produced by Ontario's Ministry of Transportation. (The information contained will apply not just to BC, but to all Canadian drivers in all jurisdictions. The information is BC's interpretation of the rules, which won't vary substantially from other jurisdictions - except possibly Alberta's intraprovincial carriers.)

The Ten Year Plan 
This is an article that ran in highwaySTAR in February 2006 outlining the new rules and pointing out most of the substantial changes.

HOS Compliance Checklist
Here's a page right out of the enforcement officer's handbook -- literally. Inspectors will run through this list as they're checking your logs. If you follow the same checklist BEFORE they get to see your log, you'll know where you stand. Download this and keep it with you for easy reference. Even though it's from Alberta, inspectors in other jurisdictions will be using a similar list.


In the Magazine

You'll find these and other stories in the highwaySTAR print magazine this month. Available at your favourite truckstop.


  • From B.C. to Ontario proud truckers pulled out the polish and showed off their rigs, and we were there in Chilliwack and Stirling.
  • It took something unique to protect Ron Nichols' new truck from the wildlife roaming the prairie highways.
  • At a little B.C. museum a bunch of retired Teamsters drivers recall what a career in trucking is really all about ý comradeship.